LB 550–Heading Toward a Police State?

Last year, we expressed some concern about LB 550–a bill which seemed to us to cross some lines which we deemed threatening to liberty.  The bill didn’t go anywhere last year, although it did receive a hearing, and was placed on General File (1st Reading) before the end of the session.

This year, it was advanced quickly, being passed from General File, to Select File, and being placed on Final Reading on Wednesday, January 27.

As of this moment, we don’t know when it will come before the Legislature for actual Reading and votes, but we want our readers to know a little bit about it.

The Fiscal Note for the Bill says that it “Does not include any impact on political subdivisions.”

The Introducer of the bill is Sen. Bill Avery (Lincoln), District 28.

The summary of purpose for the bill:

LB 550 extends law enforcement authority the Nebraska National Guard members serving in federal Title 32 United States Code status. It also extends law enforcement authority to National Guard members from other states and
territories that come to the aid of Nebraska. Currently, National Guard members have law enforcement authority while on state active duty orders in a state status.
The bill requires the Governor to specifically grant law enforcement authority and provides the ability to limit it when necessary. Currently this authority is granted automatically upon a call to state active duty.
It’s a little unclear, though, whether this bill marks a significant change in current law, or whether it’s merely clarifying what already exists.  We will continue to research it over the next few days, and hope that our readers will do the same.  Let us know what you think–should we be worried about an imminent police state, or is this merely confirming what already exists?  Leave your comments below.
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5 Comments

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5 responses to “LB 550–Heading Toward a Police State?

  1. Pingback: ACTION ALERT: Call your State Senator Friday AM | Grassroots in Nebraska

  2. I agree 100%. I just ran across this bill and as far as I can see it is on the Governor’s desk. Sound the alarm, this is a bad bill. And please note who enacts legislation of EVERY BILL, “The people in the State of Nebraska.” Did you know you enacted this BILL. as well as every BILL?

    FAX, and CALL the Governor’s office 471-2244 FAX 471-6031. 45 SENATORS voted FOR this unconstitutional bill. GOVERNOR -DON’T SIGN.

  3. Pingback: ACTION ALERT: Call Your Nebraska State Senator Thursday Noon-2 p.m. | Grassroots in Nebraska

  4. Jon Tucker

    Here’s some information that adds to the reason why we don’t need to increase the Nebraska National Guard’s policing authority…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_spies#Colorado_Fuel_and_Iron:_a_pattern_of_brutality

    In 1927, the Governor of Colorado agreed to send in the Colorado National Guard against striking coal miners which was later known as the Columbine Mine massacre.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbine_Mine_massacre

    We don’t want that kind of thing happening here.

  5. Will Ramsey

    32 U.S.C. “National Guard” is the federal code for this subject. I looked through the code and the only police activities granted to the National Guard are drug-interdiction and counter-drug activities. LB 550 would appear to broaden that to include ALL police powers. This seems like a progressive step toward the unification of all military and police.

    In fact, President Obama recently penned an Executive Order to establish a “Council of Governors” that will facilitate a more standardized state, local, and federal police/military. Also, an amendment to Executive Order 12425 cleared Interpol of Constitutional restrictions.

    The Posse Comitatus Act, a Federal Law (18 U.S.C. § 1385) passed on June 18, 1878, forbids military from conducting police action. LB 550 is clearly in violation of this law.

    What I really wonder is WHO the military and police will be targeting? Drug cartels, Islamo-terrorists, political dissidents, all of the above, or is it “just in case?”

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